The Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence

The Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence recognizes excellence in research leading to new understanding and novel developments in microsystems and related technologies.

Examples of such technologies include Photonics/Optoelectronics, Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS), Microelectronics, Microfluidics and Embedded Software, or the application of microsystems and related technologies in Canada. The annual award includes a medal and a monetary prize of $4,500. Previous winners include truly innovative researchers from across Canada. 


Eligibility

Candidates for the award may be faculty, students or alumnae who have successfully completed a Master's or PhD degree in a Canadian university within the previous three calendar years. Nominations may be submitted by the university, a microelectronics or microelectronics-related company in Canada or jointly by a company and a university. Joint nominations are strongly encouraged. Canadian citizens, landed immigrants or persons who have been Canadian residents for three years prior to the date of nomination are eligible. Nominations are not restricted to those pursuing academic study or holding an academic appointment.

Application Requirements

A nomination must include the curriculum vitae of the nominee and a covering letter which addresses the nominee's achievements in research and the importance of the nominee's contributions to the discipline and related industry. The nominators should provide names of additional external authorities to whom reference might be made if required. Each nomination must be accompanied by two references, of which one must be academic.  

Further Conditions and Application Guidelines

All nominating institutions/companies should:

2013 Winner:

Dr. Muhammad Alam

The 2013 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence was awarded to Dr. Muhammad Alam in recognition of his contributions to the development of hybrid plasmonic waveguides and related technologies.
   Dr. Muhammad Alam (left), received the Douglas R. Colton Medal from Dr. Ian L. McWalter, President and CEO of CMC Microsystems, at the 2013 Annual Symposium. Dr. Alam’s transformative research lead to the development of the hybrid plasmonic wave guide system that has stimulated worldwide interest and activity in this field. This technology provides the optimized combination of high optical confinement and reduced optical propagation loss.
 

Previous Winners:

Dr. Xinyu Liu

The 2012 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence was awarded to Dr. Xinyu Liu for the development of innovative microbotic and bio MEMS technologies that enable high-throughput, automated manipulation and characterization of single cells for biological and medical applications.

   Dr. Xinyu Liu (right), received the Douglas R. Colton Medal from Dr. Ian L. McWalter, President and CEO of CMC Microsystems, at the 2012 Annual Symposium. 

Dr. Leyla Soleymani

The 2011 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence was awarded to Dr. Leyla Soleymani in recognition of the excellence and transformative nature of her research. Dr. Soleymani has designed, fabricated and tested microelectrode arrays for bio-sensing applications that include medical diagnostics and environmental monitoring. Her research has the potential to contribute significantly to the advancement of societal health and wellness.

Dr. Leyla Soleymani (right), graduate of McMaster University, received the Douglas R. Colton Medal from Dr. Ian L. McWalter, President and CEO of CMC Microsystems, at the 2011 Annual Symposium. Dr. Soleymani was given the Colton Award in recognition of the excellence and transformative nature of her research. Her research has the potential to contribute significantly to the advancement of societal health and wellness.


Dr. Leyla Soleymani (right), McMaster University, was nominated for the Colton Award by the University of Toronto and McMaster University.

Dr. Adam Kinsman

The 2010 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence was awarded to Dr. Kinsman in recognition of his work on the development of new computer-aided methods that enable the design of reliable, cost-effective and high-performance embedded systems. Dr. Kinsman has “stuck gold”, starting a search for efficient reconfigurable computing implementations. At the time of award presentation, Dr. Kinsman was the Co-Founder and VP Research and Development of Accelyst Technologies Inc.

Dr. Adam Kinsman (right), graduate of McMaster University, was nominated for the Colton Award “for the development of new computer-aided methods that enable the design of reliable, cost-effective and high-performance embedded systems.”    

Dr. Reza Chaji

The 2009 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence was awarded to Dr. Chaji in recognition of his work on the development of new pixel architecture based on thin film transistors fabricated in low-cost technologies. His research has led to several novel pixel architectures and driving schemes for displays, sensors and imagers, which provide far better stability, lower power consumption, longer lifetime and higher resolution devices. Dr. Chaji's research has been the heart of the IGNIS Innovation Inc. development plan, where Dr. Chaji is Chief Scientist and Director of Technology. 

2009 Colton Award Winner

Dr. Reza Chaji (left), Chief Scientist and Director of Technology, IGNIS Innovation Inc. and graduate of the University of Waterloo received the Douglas R. Colton Medal from Dr. Ian L. McWalter (right), President & CEO, CMC Microsystems, at the 2009 CMC Microsystems Annual Symposium. Dr.Chaji's work on thin film transistors has resulted in over 50 patents and several prestigious scholarships and awards.

 
Dr. Daryoosh Saeedkia

The 2008 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence was awarded to Dr. Saeedkia in recognition of his research on terahertz photoconductive sources and detectors and terahertz photonics devices and systems as well as a comprehensive study of the interaction of lasers with ultra-fast photoconductors and high-temperature superconductors. His contribution to the research has led to the commercialization of terahertz photoconductive sources and detectors by T-Ray Sciences Inc. and will potentially lead to a breakthrough in the emerging areas of terahertz bio-sensing and medical imaging.

 

Dr. Daryoosh Saeedkia (right), Chief Technology Officer of T-Ray Sciences Inc. and graduate of the University of Waterloo received the Douglas R. Colton Medal from Dr. Ian L. McWalter (left), President & CEO, CMC Microsystems, at the 2008 CMC Microsystems Annual Symposium.

Dr. Daryoosh Saeedkia (right), Chief Technology Officer of T-Ray Sciences Inc. and graduate of the University of Waterloo received the Douglas R. Colton Medal from Dr. Ian L. McWalter (left), President & CEO, CMC Microsystems, at the 2008 CMC Microsystems Annual Symposium. Dr. Saeedkia's research in terahertz photoconductive sources and detectors has been designated by the University of Waterloo for Outstanding Achievement in Graduate Studies in Doctoral Level in the Faculty of Engineering, has received several Faculty of Engineering scholarships as well as a recipient of the NSERC postdoctoral fellowship.

Dr. Behraad Bahreyni

The 2007 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence was awarded to Dr. Bahreyni in recognition of his research discoveries which demonstrate significant potential for industrial applications ranging from the design of award winning electric field sensors for monitoring electric power lines and gas piping, to better calibration of MRI systems for the health industry, to the realization of MEMS-based integrated systems for telecommunications.
Dr. Behraad Bahreyni (right) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering Science at Simon Fraser University. He graduated from the University of Manitoba with his PhD degree in 2006 and received the Douglas R. Colton Medal from Dr. Doug Colton (left), Director Emeritus, CMC, at the 2007 CMC Microsystems Annual Symposium. Dr. Behraad Bahreyni (right) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering Science at Simon Fraser University. He graduated from the University of Manitoba with his PhD degree in 2006 and received the Douglas R. Colton Medal from Dr. Doug Colton (left), Director Emeritus, CMC, at the 2007 CMC Microsystems Annual Symposium. Dr. Behraad Bahreyni's research has led to a number of innovations, including the creation of unique frequency-based magnetic field sensors and self-driven MEMS oscillators.

 

Honourable Mention:

Dr Amirhossein Alimohammad

The 2007 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence Honourable Mention was presented to Dr. Alimohammad of the University of Alberta in recognition for his excellent work in how novel field-programmable gate array (FPGA) applications can attract industrial interest and lead to commercialization activity. 

Dr. Amirhossein Alimohammad (right), Postdoctoral Fellow in the iCORE High Capacity Digital Communications Laboratory is awarded Honourable Mention for the 2007 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence. Dr. Amirhossein Alimohammad (right), Postdoctoral Fellow in the iCORE High Capacity Digital Communications Laboratory is awarded Honourable Mention for the 2007 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence. Dr. Alimohammad’s work has led to an award-winning business plan for a new start-up venture, as well as on-going discussions with potential licensees among major vendors where he is contributing to the design and modeling of Micro and Nano-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS/NEMS) and interfacing electronics. He received the Honourable Mention from Dr. Doug Colton (left), Director Emeritus, CMC at the 2007 CMC Microsystems Annual Symposium in Ottawa, Ontario.

Dr. David Sinton

The 2006 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence was awarded to Dr. Sinton in recognition of his successful application of microfluidics theory and experimental techniques to innovative work on new bio-medical devices and micro hydrogen fuel cells. He has developed a highly successful, productive and well funded research program, and truly established himself as a young leader in this field of research.

Dr. David Sinton (right), Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Victoria and graduate of the University of Toronto Dr. David Sinton (right), Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Victoria and graduate of the University of Toronto has made many original contributions to the field of microfluidics. He has successfully applied the theory and experimental techniques of microfluidics to innovative work on developing new bio-medical devices and micro hydrogen fuel cells. He received the Douglas R. Colton Medal from Dr. Doug Colton (left), Director Emeritus, CMC at the 2006 CMC Microsystems Annual Symposium in Ottawa, Ontario.

 

Dr. John T. W. Yeow

The 2005 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence was awarded to Dr. Yeow in recognition of the development of micromachined-based OCT systems that could improve health care through: significant improvement in hardware performance in terms of quality image; acquisition of in-vivo images with good special resolution; minimally invasive endoscopy procedures, thereby reducing patient stress.

 

Dr. John Yeow (left), Assistant Professor of Systems Design Engineering at the University of Waterloo and graduate of the University of Toronto, receives the Colton Medal from Dr. Ian McWalter Dr. John Yeow (left), Assistant Professor of Systems Design Engineering at the University of Waterloo and graduate of the University of Toronto, performs research that helps to enable the effective and non-invasive diagnosis of disease, enabling earlier intervention and more accurate treatment. He received the Colton Medal from Dr. Ian McWalter (right), former CMC Microsystems Chair of the Board and previous President of Gennum Corporation at the 2005 CMC Microsystems Annual Symposium.

 

Dr. Mohab Anis

Dr. Mohab Anis is a graduate of the University of Waterloo where he is now an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.  He was given the Douglas R. Colton award for exemplary research and collaborations which have had a significant impact on the advancement of leakage-tolerant integrated circuits and computer-aided methodologies that are essential for the manufacturing of wireless information processing systems.

Dr. Mohab Anis (left), Assistant Professor, University of Waterloo,  receives the prestigious Colton Medal for Research Excellence from Dr. Douglas Colton (right), Director Emeritus, CMC Microsystems at MR&DCAN 2004. Dr. Mohab Anis (left), Assistant Professor, University of Waterloo,  receives the prestigious Colton Medal for Research Excellence from Dr. Douglas Colton (right), Director Emeritus, CMC Microsystems at MR&DCAN 2004.

Dr. Karim S. Karim

Dr. Karim, a Assistant Professor of the School of Engineering Science at Simon Fraser University, and a graduate of the University of Waterloo, performs research into the development of silicon semiconductor devices and circuits for large area imaging, display and solar applications. The 2003 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence was awarded to Dr. Karim in recognition of research and collaborations which have had a significant impact on the large-scale sensor field and helped to advance microsystems into the realm of human health.

Dr. Karim Karim (right), graduate of the University of Waterloo and Assistant Professor of the School of Engineering Science at Simon Fraser University, was awarded the Colton Medal in 2003 for exemplary research and collaborations that have had a significant positive impact on the large-scale sensor field and helped to advance microsystems into the realm of human health. Dr. Ian McWalter (left), President of Gennum Corporation and Chair of the Board of CMC, presented the award to Dr. Karim in Montréal, Québec at MR&DCAN 2003. Dr. Karim Karim (right), graduate of the University of Waterloo and Assistant Professor of the School of Engineering Science at Simon Fraser University, was awarded the Colton Medal in 2003 for exemplary research and collaborations that have had a significant positive impact on the large-scale sensor field and helped to advance microsystems into the realm of human health. Dr. Ian McWalter (left), President of Gennum Corporation and Chair of the Board of CMC, presented the award to Dr. Karim in Montréal, Québec at MR&DCAN 2003.

Dr. Martin Dvorak

Dr. Martin Dvorak, graduate of Simon Fraser University , is presently an R&D Engineer with Agilent Technologies' Microwave Technology Center in Santa Rosa, California, where he is contributing to the development of high performance indium phosphide heterojunction bipolar transistor integrated circuits (InP HBT ICs). The award was presented in recognition of Dr. Dvorak's exemplary research and development of the world's fastest bi-polar heterostructure transistor (as at May 2002) and his contribution to the development of technologies for heterostructure devices that will significantly improve Internet transmission rates.

Dr. Glenn Chapman (left), Associate Professor at Simon Fraser University, accepts the award on Dr. Dvorak's behalf at the CMC 2002 annual symposium from CMC's first President and Director Emeritus, Dr. Douglas Colton (right). Dr. Glenn Chapman (left), Associate Professor at Simon Fraser University, accepts the award on Dr. Dvorak's behalf at the CMC 2002 annual symposium from CMC's first President and Director Emeritus, Dr. Douglas Colton (right).

Dr. Duncan Elliott

The recipient of the 2001 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence was Dr. Duncan Elliott, a faculty member at the University of Alberta and a graduate of the University of Toronto .  The award was presented in recognition of Dr. Elliott's Computational RAM work involving the integration of narrow-pitch processors into memory to achieve high memory bandwidth.  He collaborated with both MOSAID Technologies and Lumic Electronics to further develop Computational RAM for commercialization.

Duncan Elliott (right) receiving the 2001 D.R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence from D.R. Colton (left), first President of CMC.

Duncan Elliott (right) receiving the 2001 D.R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence from D.R. Colton (left), first President of CMC.

Dr. Kevin Robbie

The winner of the Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence in 2000 was Dr. Kevin Robbie. Dr. Robbie received his doctorate from the University of Alberta and presently holds a Canada Research Chair at Queen's University. He received the Colton Medal in recognition of his investigation of a new technique for fabricating semi-porous materials with structural control on the scale of tens of nanometers.  This technique allows materials to be fabricated with properties that can be engineered for specific applications.

Kevin Robbie (centre) receiving the 2000 D.R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence from D.R. Colton (left) and Tony Marsh, Former President, CMC (right). Kevin Robbie (centre) receiving the 2000 D.R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence from D.R. Colton (left) and Tony Marsh, Former President, CMC (right).

Dr. Vaughn Betz

The recipient of the 1999 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence was Dr. Vaughn Betz The award was presented in recognition of Dr. Betz's ground-breaking work and improvements in state-of-the-art solutions relating to architecture and CAD for speed and area optimization of FPGAs.  A graduate of the University of Toronto , Dr. Betz now works with the Altera Toronto Technology Center (originally Right Track CAD Corp. - a spin-off company from the FPGA research group in the University or Toronto's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, acquired by Altera Corporation in May 2000).

Vaughn Betz (centre) accompanied by his wife, Corinne Wolfe-Betz (right), receiving the 1999 D.R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence from Ian McWalter (left), Chair of the Board of Directors, CMC. Vaughn Betz (centre) accompanied by his wife, Corinne Wolfe-Betz (right), receiving the 1999 D.R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence from Ian McWalter (left), Chair of the Board of Directors, CMC.

Dr. Steven Wilton

The 1998 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence was awarded to Dr. Steven Wilton a faculty member in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia and a graduate of the University of Toronto. Dr. Wilton's research into both the architecture and CAD tools for Field-Programmable Gate Arrays with on-chip storage significantly impacted the device design of several leading FPGA vendors.

Dr. Daniel Massicotte

Dr. Daniel Massicotte received the 1997 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence. The award was presented in recognition of the international quality and industrial relevance of Dr. Massicotte's research combining his work on signal processing and the implementation of high-performance algorithms. Dr. Massicotte is a graduate of École Polytechnique de Montréal and now holds a faculty position in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières.

Dr. John Long

The recipient of the 1996 Douglas R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence was Dr. John R. Long. The award was presented in recognition of the relevance and impact of Dr. Long's research in the field of integrating radio receiver circuits on silicon chips. Dr. Long is a graduate of Carleton University and a former Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto . In 1995, Dr. Long won the valuable Canadian Semiconductor Design Association Design Award, for his TEXPO presentation A 1.9GHz Low-Voltage Silicon Bipolar Receiver Front-end for Personal Communications. Dr. Long currently lives in the Netherlands and is teaching at the Delft University of Technology.

Dr. Ivars Finvers

The 1995 winner of The D.R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence was Dr. Ivars Finvers. A graduate of and now a Adjunct Professor at the University of Calgary, Dr. Finvers won the award for his thesis research on the design, analysis and implementation of precision operational amplifiers in a standard CMOS process for operation at 200 degrees Celsius. Dr. Finvers was also the winner of the 1993 Canadian Semiconductor Design Association Design Award for his TEXPO demonstration Deep Fried Electronics.

Dr. Steven Dew

Dr. Steven Dew was winner of the 1994 D.R. Colton Medal for Research Excellence. A graduate of the University of Alberta, Dr. Dew is now a Professor and Associate Dean of Research and Planning in the university's Department of Electrical Engineering. Dr. Dew won the award for his thesis research on the development of a new microelectronics process simulator called SIMBAD. A highly successful development, SIMBAD is being marketed by the Alberta Microelectronic Corporation.