Hailey Rodgers

MEMSCAP PiezoMUMPs Process Technology

PiezoMUMPs is a piezoelectric-based MEMS process for ME, ECE and biomedical researchers to develop sensors, energy harvesters, ultrasonic transducers, microphones, and self-contained microsystems for automotive, aerospace, healthcare and entertainment electronics markets. Note: The expected number of chips to be delivered for this technology is 15.

AMF Silicon Photonics General-Purpose Fabrication Process

Silicon-on-insulator, 220-nm top Si film, 2000-nm buried oxide (BOX) High resistivity handle wafer (>750 ohm-cm) 193-nm deep UV lithography for waveguides, enabling features down to approximately 140 nm Two partial etches and one full etch of the top silicon 6 implants for optical modulators (P++, P+, P, N++, N+, N) Germanium deposition and implanting for photodetectors …

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AMS 0.35 µm CMOS Process Technology (High-Voltage)

This 0.35 µm CMOS technology offers four metal layers, digital standard cells, an anti-reflective coating and high-efficiency photodiodes, and bulk micromachining. CMC’s multi-project wafer service delivers this technology from austriamicrosystems, offering three processes: Basic, Opto and High-Voltage (see details below). The technology is suitable for: High-Voltage Process (H35B4D3) Details Technology Features: 4 metal and 2 poly layers with a …

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AMS 0.35 µm CMOS Process Technology (Opto)

This 0.35 μm CMOS technology offers four metal layers, digital standard cells, an anti-reflective coating and high-efficiency photodiodes, and bulk micromachining. CMC’s multi-project wafer service delivers this technology from austriamicrosystems, offering three processes: Basic, Opto (see details below) and High-Voltage. Opto Process (C35B4O1) Details Technology Features: 4 metal and 2 poly layers (similar to basic option) High-efficiency …

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AMS 0.35 µm CMOS Process Technology (Basic)

This 0.35 μm CMOS technology offers four metal layers, digital standard cells, an anti-reflective coating and high-efficiency photodiodes, and bulk micromachining. CMC’s multi-project wafer service delivers this technology from austriamicrosystems, offering three processes: Basic (see details below), Opto and High-Voltage. Basic Process (C35B4C3) Details Technology Features: 4 metal and 2 poly layers Supply Voltage: 3.3/5V Bulk-micromachining option, allowing …

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TSMC 0.35 µm CMOS Process Technology

This 0.35 μm CMOS technology is available through CMC’s multi-project wafer service, which delivers Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) nanometer and micron-scale CMOS technologies. Applications The 0.35 µm CMOS (CMC term is CMOSP35) process is suitable for: Analog circuits RF circuits Mixed-signal circuits Process Details Electrical Contact Forming Technology: Polycide Layers: 4 metal, 2 poly Supply Voltages: …

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Synopsys Design Tools

Synopsys provides a comprehensive portfolio of tools for silicon design and verification, FPGA development, photonic device and system design, fabrication process and atomic-scale modelling. Software tools available in this bundle include: Silicon Design: IC Compiler II, IC Validator, NanoTime, PrimeTime Suite, TestMAX Verification: Verdi3, Design Vision, IC Compiler, HSPICE, FineSim, VC Static and VC VIP …

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SolidWorks Software Packages

SolidWorks Software Packages cover 2D and 3D part modelling, large assembly design, sheet metal and weldments, surfacing, molds, product configuration, and 3D rendering and design analysis for manufacturing and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM). For a full list of the SolidWorks tools available in this package, please refer to the SolidWorks Quick Start Guide. We offer Standard and …

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A gem of a technology

Dr. David Roy-Guay, right, is working with students Vincent Halde (centre) and Olivier Bernard to miniaturize his novel, diamond-based magnetometer prototype. The quantum sensor technology shows promise in a wide variety of applications, including research in outer space.

Deep Learning, Big Impact

Building on his groundbreaking work in computer hardware innovation, Andreas Moshovos (second from left) of University of Toronto is leading a national network of university researchers focused on advancing machine learning into new levels of function akin to human capabilities of hearing, sensing or reading.

Breaking sound barriers

Dr. Tony Sinclair (right), University of Toronto, and Master’s student Neelesh Bhadwal, work with business partners on ways to improve the precision and reliability of ultrasonic imaging used to monitor the integrity of critical infrastructure.

Professor Walied A Moussa, University of Alberta

Unlocking the power of 3D touch

University of Alberta Professor Walied Moussa and graduate student Shichao Yue have taken touchscreen capability to a new level through their development of a “Real Touch” 3D sensor array (inset) that can measure the full range of forces on a surface with unprecedented sensitivity.

photo of Malcolm Eade, Spectra CEO; Graham Gibson, Hannah Dies, Aris Docoslis and Josh Raveendran.

Nano research yields sensing breakthrough

Nanofabrication capabilities helped Queen’s University researchers and their graduate students develop a novel, highly sensitive portable biosensor that can be manufactured simply and inexpensively. Their technology now forms the basis of an award-winning startup company, Spectra Plasmonics. Shown left to right: Malcolm Eade, Spectra CEO; Graham Gibson, Hannah Dies, Aris Docoslis and Josh Raveendran.

Small, sensitive sensors sound out new markets

Developing ultra-sensitive vibration sensors for a global defence company enabled microsensor
innovator Dr. Behraad Bahreyni (left) and his team at Simon Fraser University to identify new commercial
opportunities—and establish an award-winning startup company—for advancing their technologies into
civilian applications.

New direction for a dependable dish

Neil Roy Choudhury and Hamid Sadabadi, Concordia University graduates, leveraged their mutual expertise and interest in microfluidics and biosensing to create their Calgary-based startup, Frontier Fluidics. Experience using advanced design tools and industrial manufacturing processes is enabling them to create next-generation labs-on-a-chip that mimic real-world environments, customized for innovators doing a broad range of research and experimentation.

Motsai Chenard, 2017Aug

Integration innovation: Low power, high function

Dr. Jean Samuel Chenard’s graduate student research more than a decade ago into integrated, networked technologies anticipated the Internet of Things. Today, Motsai Inc., the company he founded on his research, develops specialized, sophisticated technologies for wearable device and telecommunications markets.

Resolving a Quantum Conundrum

Nanomechanics specialist John P. Davis (left) and his students Pearse
and Callum Doolin developed the first digital photodetector capable of
measuring the quantum properties of nanomechanical systems. Their
instrument, now on the market through their startup company Resolved
Instruments, opens up new opportunities in the emerging field of quantum
technologies.

Novel transceiver paves the way for a battery-less future

A fresh approach to wireless transceiver design has helped École de technologie supérieure professors Frederic Nabki (bottom right) and Dominic Deslandes (bottom centre) develop a new technology with dramatically lower energy requirements, offering potential for devices that never need recharging Their chip is now being commercialized by their startup company, SPARK Microsystems. Other team members, from left to right include Rabia Rassil, Antoine Collerette, Gabriel Morin-Laporte and Michiel Soer.

Western University’s Jun Yang (left) and Patrick Therrien (right), showing award and a bottle of Formicast Resin

Formi 3DP: Spawning the ‘stem cells’ for circuitry

Western University’s Jun Yang (left) uses surface chemistry to modify and add functionality to materials through initiator-integrated 3D printing (i3DP). Formi 3DP, his startup company co-founded with assistance from Patrick Therrien (right), uses this novel, low-cost process to develop polymer “stem cells” capable of creating 3-D objects with user-defined properties, and holds promise for the efficient production of complex electronic circuitry.

Photo of University of Waterloo innovator Karim Karim (far right) and his team

Reinventing X-ray technology

University of Waterloo innovator Karim Karim (far right) and his team combined existing LCD technology
and manufacturing processes with a unique electronic architecture to create better, safer and lower-cost
X-ray imaging. Their technology offers the potential to improve disease screening and diagnosis worldwide,
especially in remote and underserved communities.

Photo of Dr. Réjean Fontaine and his graduate students at Université de Sherbrooke examining the detection system of their novel LabPET II small-animal scanner.

Small scanners offer big advances

Dr. Réjean Fontaine and his graduate students at Université de Sherbrooke examine the detection system
of their novel LabPET II small-animal scanner. Data-acquisition capability integrated within the system
enables imaging with unprecedented contrast-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. The technology has earn
multiple awards for his graduate students.

Dr. Boris Stoeber with company co-founder Iman Mansoor and Dr. Mehrsa Raeiszadeh, a Microdermics employee, demonstrating less invasive blood sampling.

Taking the sting out of injections

Dr. Boris Stoeber (right), professor at University of British Columbia, is redefining drug delivery through the
development of painless, hollow metal microneedle arrays that barely penetrate the skin. More recently,
he and his team have integrated optical sensing properties into these arrays, offering a faster, cheaper and
less invasive alternative to hypodermic-based blood sampling for drug monitoring. Founder of microneedle
startup Microdermics, he is shown here with company co-founder Iman Mansoor (centre) and Dr. Mehrsa
Raeiszadeh (left), Microdermics employee.

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